Discussion:
Aurora tonight
(too old to reply)
Andrew Bading
2003-10-25 18:35:12 UTC
Permalink
Coronal mass ejection, good chance for auroral activity tonight. Peak
expected about 10 pm ET in North Am.

Good Luck
Mike Romain
2003-10-25 22:02:46 UTC
Permalink
Crap, it's cloudy up here in my part of Canada!

Mike
86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00
88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT's
Post by Andrew Bading
Coronal mass ejection, good chance for auroral activity tonight. Peak
expected about 10 pm ET in North Am.
Good Luck
Gary S.
2003-10-25 22:52:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Romain
86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00
88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT's
Post by Andrew Bading
Coronal mass ejection, good chance for auroral activity tonight. Peak
expected about 10 pm ET in North Am.
Crap, it's cloudy up here in my part of Canada!
Mike
Your Weather Service does that, too?

Think of all the technology that goes into creating clouds at the same
time as astronomical events, directly over the people wanting to view
them.

Happy trails,
Gary (net.yogi.bear)
------------------------------------------------
at the 51st percentile of ursine intelligence

Gary D. Schwartz, Needham, MA, USA
Please reply to: garyDOTschwartzATpoboxDOTcom
Ed Huesers
2003-10-26 03:45:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary S.
Post by Mike Romain
auroral activity tonight. Peak expected about 10 pm ET in North Am.
Crap, it's cloudy up here in my part of Canada!
Your Weather Service does that, too?
Think of all the technology that goes into creating clouds at the same
time as astronomical events, directly over the people wanting to view
them.
Just drove out of town here in Colorado to see, nope, nothing. I've
seen them twice in the 28 years I've been here.

Ed Huesers
Shameless plug: http://www.grandshelters.com
Andrew Bading
2003-10-26 10:57:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Huesers
Post by Gary S.
Post by Mike Romain
auroral activity tonight. Peak expected about 10 pm ET in North Am.
Crap, it's cloudy up here in my part of Canada!
Your Weather Service does that, too?
Think of all the technology that goes into creating clouds at the same
time as astronomical events, directly over the people wanting to view
them.
Just drove out of town here in Colorado to see, nope, nothing. I've
seen them twice in the 28 years I've been here.
Ed Huesers
Shameless plug: http://www.grandshelters.com
I'xe seen them twice here (Ohio)in 40 years. Socked in with clouds
tonight. This is the 2nd or 3rd time I've posted an aurora alert here in
r.b. The weather never cooperates. They're visible as far south as FL.
about once a decade.
Gary S.
2003-10-26 11:28:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Bading
Post by Ed Huesers
Just drove out of town here in Colorado to see, nope, nothing. I've
seen them twice in the 28 years I've been here.
Ed Huesers
Shameless plug: http://www.grandshelters.com
I'xe seen them twice here (Ohio)in 40 years. Socked in with clouds
tonight. This is the 2nd or 3rd time I've posted an aurora alert here in
r.b. The weather never cooperates. They're visible as far south as FL.
about once a decade.
I've seen them well once, in northern NH, at a cabin about 10 miles
from the nearest large town, at the north edge of the largest roadless
area in the Whites in NH.

Well worth going to see them, whatever, wherever. Pictures only barely
capture this phenomenon.

Happy trails,
Gary (net.yogi.bear)
------------------------------------------------
at the 51st percentile of ursine intelligence

Gary D. Schwartz, Needham, MA, USA
Please reply to: garyDOTschwartzATpoboxDOTcom
Eugene Miya
2003-10-27 18:28:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary S.
Well worth going to see them, whatever, wherever. Pictures only barely
capture this phenomenon.
Well you can try video.

Photos are an integration over time.

Word don't do it. Almost as impressive as totality in a solar eclipse.
George Cleveland
2003-10-27 22:44:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Gary S.
Well worth going to see them, whatever, wherever. Pictures only barely
capture this phenomenon.
Well you can try video.
Photos are an integration over time.
Word don't do it. Almost as impressive as totality in a solar eclipse.
Growing up in an area where ABs were fairly common, it was always surprising to
see the effect even relatively mild ones had on my more southerly raised
friends. On the other hand, a *big* auraural display is an incredible thing to
behold, almost spooky, in a "Day of Judgement" sort of way.

g.c.

Not that I spend much time worrying about that.
Eugene Miya
2003-10-27 23:41:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Cleveland
Growing up in an area where ABs were fairly common, it was always surprising to
see the effect even relatively mild ones had on my more southerly raised
friends. On the other hand, a *big* auraural display is an incredible thing to
behold, almost spooky, in a "Day of Judgement" sort of way.
They can creep up on you.

I saw my first about 8 years or or so ago.
It was an amazing first day of a week and a half of meetings in Fairbanks.
A friend ran a marathon, and after some provisioning and a nap, we flew
into the Brooks Range. It was still light around 1030 and we had a
small tent and I asked if we could see the aurora. He said without even
turning in his sleeping bag: yeah that's it out there. It appeared as a
thin wisp of a high cloud in the twilight. Over the course of the next
week, with real clouds going in and out, we'd watch it at our meetings
(locals had seen it all before of course). We had a couple of nice
nights, but the first photo attempts were washed out.

Winter isn't bad.

Big displays remind me of certain special effects attempts in films.

On the other hand big fires are be impressive, too.
Mike Romain
2003-10-28 18:43:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by George Cleveland
Growing up in an area where ABs were fairly common, it was always surprising to
see the effect even relatively mild ones had on my more southerly raised
friends. On the other hand, a *big* auraural display is an incredible thing to
behold, almost spooky, in a "Day of Judgement" sort of way.
They can creep up on you.
I saw my first about 8 years or or so ago.
It was an amazing first day of a week and a half of meetings in Fairbanks.
A friend ran a marathon, and after some provisioning and a nap, we flew
into the Brooks Range. It was still light around 1030 and we had a
small tent and I asked if we could see the aurora. He said without even
turning in his sleeping bag: yeah that's it out there. It appeared as a
thin wisp of a high cloud in the twilight. Over the course of the next
week, with real clouds going in and out, we'd watch it at our meetings
(locals had seen it all before of course). We had a couple of nice
nights, but the first photo attempts were washed out.
Winter isn't bad.
Big displays remind me of certain special effects attempts in films.
On the other hand big fires are be impressive, too.
Ohh man, a 'Good' display is something else!

When I lived in the Canadian Rockies we were lucky enough to catch a
couple wild ones. It was amazing. A bunch of us or my wife, son and I
would drive up to a large pot hole lake on the side of a mountain peak
and go out on the ice (for a wide angle view) to watch them lots. We
could even hear them a few times on a dead still cold night, they sort
of hiss.

Mike
86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00
88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT's
Ed Huesers
2003-10-28 04:28:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Gary S.
Well worth going to see them, whatever, wherever. Pictures only barely
capture this phenomenon.
Well you can try video.
That would be the only thing that would do any justice to the most
spectacular light show I've ever seen in ND in my youth.
Post by Eugene Miya
Photos are an integration over time.
Some times it changes very rapidly.
Post by Eugene Miya
Word don't do it.
Well, the ones in my youth were impressive with the reds, blues and
yellows moving around slowly, changing positions and returning.
Basically blotches of color that were dancing in the sky the way you
would imagine a full screen lava lamp. But a lava lamp isn't quite right
either because some blotches had distinct edges and other edges blending
slowly into the dark sky or the next colored blotch. It was just short
of Disney's "Fantasia".
But then one time it was again the dancing blotches of color except
there was also a very prevalent streaking across the sky. The speed at
which the streaking was going on made it the most prevalent part of the
show. It looked like a beam from an airport light cruising through a
cloud or one of those spot lights they have going when they are having a
sale at one of your largest dealers.
Only these spot lights looked like they were positioned hundreds or
thousands of miles north of where I was watching them. They were also
spaced at random positions behind the northern horizon and shining
south. The colors were again all three primary colors and anything
inbetween. They sometimes swept from one horizon to the other in less
than a second and others took up to twenty seconds. Some swept left and
others right.
The sweeping beams seemed to be above or behind the slow moving
blotches that dominated the sky other than the fast moving beams causing
a distinct overture to the entire show.
Post by Eugene Miya
Almost as impressive as totality in a solar eclipse.
I beg to differ.

Ed Huesers
Shameless plug: http://www.grandshelters.com
Eugene Miya
2003-10-30 20:05:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Huesers
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Gary S.
Well worth going to see them, whatever, wherever. Pictures only barely
capture this phenomenon.
try video.
That would be the only thing that would do any justice to the most
spectacular light show I've ever seen in ND in my youth.
You can capture mirages shimmering.
Post by Ed Huesers
Post by Eugene Miya
Photos are an integration over time.
Some times it changes very rapidly.
That was the problem encountered photographing pulsar.
In their case, they synchronized a shutter so that 2 different cameras
would get differing amounts of light.

The trick Ed is to figure out how to solve the problem.
That's what Muybridge did at Stanford's place.
Anyone can take a snap shot.
Post by Ed Huesers
Post by Eugene Miya
Words don't do it.
Well, the ones in my youth were impressive with the reds, blues and
yellows moving around slowly, changing positions and returning.
Basically blotches of color that were dancing in the sky the way you
would imagine a full screen lava lamp. But a lava lamp isn't quite right
either because some blotches had distinct edges and other edges blending
slowly into the dark sky or the next colored blotch. It was just short
of Disney's "Fantasia".
This is a common comparison.
Post by Ed Huesers
But then one time it was again the dancing blotches of color except
there was also a very prevalent streaking across the sky. The speed at
which the streaking was going on made it the most prevalent part of the
show. It looked like a beam from an airport light cruising through a
cloud or one of those spot lights they have going when they are having a
sale at one of your largest dealers.
Only these spot lights looked like they were positioned hundreds or
thousands of miles north of where I was watching them. They were also
spaced at random positions behind the northern horizon and shining
south. The colors were again all three primary colors and anything
inbetween. They sometimes swept from one horizon to the other in less
than a second and others took up to twenty seconds. Some swept left and
others right.
The sweeping beams seemed to be above or behind the slow moving
blotches that dominated the sky other than the fast moving beams causing
a distinct overture to the entire show.
You almost sound like a longer version of Rutger Hauer's Bladerunner speech.
Post by Ed Huesers
Post by Eugene Miya
Almost as impressive as totality in a solar eclipse.
I beg to differ.
In which direction?

Like the part my friend Dave liked to say, "They stopped wars and
battles when eclipses happened...."
Gary S.
2003-10-30 23:05:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Ed Huesers
Post by Eugene Miya
Almost as impressive as totality in a solar eclipse.
I beg to differ.
In which direction?
Like the part my friend Dave liked to say, "They stopped wars and
battles when eclipses happened...."
Then perhaps we need more eclipses.

Happy trails,
Gary (net.yogi.bear)
------------------------------------------------
at the 51st percentile of ursine intelligence

Gary D. Schwartz, Needham, MA, USA
Please reply to: garyDOTschwartzATpoboxDOTcom
Tom B Good
2003-11-01 12:39:24 UTC
Permalink
walk outside and was red.....in a dark sky.
Michigan west of Port huron. or bottum of Lake Huron. Did not stay in
sky to long.
Eugene Miya
2003-11-13 00:00:24 UTC
Permalink
A nice photo of the Aurora taken from Soldotna, AK on Oct. 29 appeared
in this past Sunday's SJ Murky at the tail end of the Travel Section.
Had nice reds in addition to greens.
John
2003-10-26 17:17:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Bading
Post by Ed Huesers
Post by Gary S.
Post by Mike Romain
auroral activity tonight. Peak expected about 10 pm ET in North Am.
Crap, it's cloudy up here in my part of Canada!
Your Weather Service does that, too?
Think of all the technology that goes into creating clouds at the same
time as astronomical events, directly over the people wanting to view
them.
Just drove out of town here in Colorado to see, nope, nothing. I've
seen them twice in the 28 years I've been here.
Ed Huesers
Shameless plug: http://www.grandshelters.com
I'xe seen them twice here (Ohio)in 40 years. Socked in with clouds
tonight. This is the 2nd or 3rd time I've posted an aurora alert here in
r.b. The weather never cooperates. They're visible as far south as FL.
about once a decade.
I live in central FL and I will be going up to the Smokys on Thursday
for a week. I will keep my eyes open.

John
Eugene Miya
2003-10-27 18:15:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Bading
Post by Mike Romain
Post by Andrew Bading
auroral activity tonight
Crap, it's cloudy up here in my part of Canada!
I'xe seen them twice here (Ohio)in 40 years. Socked in with clouds
tonight. This is the 2nd or 3rd time I've posted an aurora alert here in
r.b. The weather never cooperates. They're visible as far south as FL.
about once a decade.
Go to Fairbanks.
They study them there.
The best time of year is supposed to be Feb. but it can be -40F.
Took photos of them, made an X-mas card of it a few years ago.

Reminds me, I need to phone and email people up there.

You can go other seasons when warmer, but you need time just in case a
front moves through. If you stay at the Princess hotel (dropping bucks),
they will call up your room when the aurora is out. Fortunately, I can
just stay with friends much cheaper.
Chris Townsend
2003-10-27 23:18:35 UTC
Permalink
In message <3f9d6eba$***@darkstar>, Eugene Miya <***@cse.ucsc.edu>
writes
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Andrew Bading
Post by Mike Romain
Post by Andrew Bading
auroral activity tonight
Crap, it's cloudy up here in my part of Canada!
I'xe seen them twice here (Ohio)in 40 years. Socked in with clouds
tonight. This is the 2nd or 3rd time I've posted an aurora alert here in
r.b. The weather never cooperates. They're visible as far south as FL.
about once a decade.
Go to Fairbanks.
They study them there.
Or Svalbard. There's a Northern Lights research station not far outside
Longyearben on Spitsbergen.
Post by Eugene Miya
The best time of year is supposed to be Feb. but it can be -40F.
Took photos of them, made an X-mas card of it a few years ago.
Reached -35F when I was on Svalbard and that was in April. Chilly
camping. It's amazing how long a block of snow can sit in a pan on a hot
stove before it starts to melt when it's that cold.

The best aurora borealis I've ever seen was in the northern Yukon
Territory. I have seen a few good ones in Norway too. And I missed one
here in the Scottish Highlands last week. It didn't start until 11.30
p.m. and I was fast asleep in my tent.
Eugene Miya
2003-10-27 23:31:30 UTC
Permalink
In article <Hw2W5jaLfan$Ew+***@auchnarrow.demon.co.uk>,
Chris Townsend <***@DELETEauchnarrow.demon.co.uk> wrote:

Back? Done?
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Andrew Bading
auroral activity tonight
Go to Fairbanks.
They study them there.
Get the Aurora Watcher's Handbook.
Post by Chris Townsend
Or Svalbard. There's a Northern Lights research station not far outside
Longyearben on Spitsbergen.
I've thought about a trip to Spitsbergen in recent days.
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
The best time of year is supposed to be Feb. but it can be -40F.
Took photos of them, made an X-mas card of it a few years ago.
Reached -35F when I was on Svalbard and that was in April. Chilly
camping. It's amazing how long a block of snow can sit in a pan on a hot
stove before it starts to melt when it's that cold.
Well Chris that's part of why you prime the melting process with a little
water to start when you have to raise it 37K just to get toward melting.
Post by Chris Townsend
The best aurora borealis I've ever seen was in the northern Yukon
Territory. I have seen a few good ones in Norway too. And I missed one
here in the Scottish Highlands last week. It didn't start until 11.30
p.m. and I was fast asleep in my tent.
Have only passed thru the Yukon, have to get back.
Alaska is drawing again, need to bump my frequent flier miles up again.

I've not seen super great ones, but a couple of nice impressive ones.

Norway, too. Lute fisk. If Pete mentions haggis.

Too much to do and try.
Chris Townsend
2003-10-28 02:51:30 UTC
Permalink
In message <3f9db8e2$***@darkstar>, Eugene Miya <***@cse.ucsc.edu>
writes
Post by Eugene Miya
Back? Done?
Back from New Hampshire a couple of weeks ago. Been away in the
Highlands for a few days since. We have fine fall colours here too. &
otherwise ploughing through the emails.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Andrew Bading
auroral activity tonight
Go to Fairbanks.
They study them there.
Get the Aurora Watcher's Handbook.
I'll look out for it.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Or Svalbard. There's a Northern Lights research station not far outside
Longyearben on Spitsbergen.
I've thought about a trip to Spitsbergen in recent days.
It's a fascinating place. 78 North. The farthest north I've been.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
The best time of year is supposed to be Feb. but it can be -40F.
Took photos of them, made an X-mas card of it a few years ago.
Reached -35F when I was on Svalbard and that was in April. Chilly
camping. It's amazing how long a block of snow can sit in a pan on a hot
stove before it starts to melt when it's that cold.
Well Chris that's part of why you prime the melting process with a little
water to start when you have to raise it 37K just to get toward melting.
Oh, I know about the water. These blocks were sitting in a couple of
inches of it. No water and the base of the pan burns.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
The best aurora borealis I've ever seen was in the northern Yukon
Territory. I have seen a few good ones in Norway too. And I missed one
here in the Scottish Highlands last week. It didn't start until 11.30
p.m. and I was fast asleep in my tent.
Have only passed thru the Yukon, have to get back.
Alaska is drawing again, need to bump my frequent flier miles up again.
I must get back to Alaska again. Sometime.
Post by Eugene Miya
I've not seen super great ones, but a couple of nice impressive ones.
The Yukon one was amazing. I lay on my back for an hour staring at the
sky, completely oblivious of the cold.
Post by Eugene Miya
Norway, too. Lute fisk. If Pete mentions haggis.
I haven't tried lute fisk.
Post by Eugene Miya
Too much to do and try.
Very true.
Eugene Miya
2003-10-30 20:00:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
the Aurora Watcher's Handbook.
Post by Chris Townsend
Or Svalbard. There's a Northern Lights research station not far outside
Longyearben on Spitsbergen.
It's a fascinating place. 78 North. The farthest north I've been.
Many places to visit and for vastly different purposes.
Chile is also interesting at work for the moment.
Post by Chris Townsend
I must get back to Alaska again. Sometime.
I am learning about Alaska cancer treatment centers......
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
I've not seen super great ones, but a couple of nice impressive ones.
The Yukon one was amazing. I lay on my back for an hour staring at the
sky, completely oblivious of the cold.
Well coming back from Kuenzli's town near Fairbanks, I saw an short
lived impressive one.
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Norway, too. Lute fisk. If Pete mentions haggis.
I haven't tried lute fisk.
Oh, it's okay. It's more challenge food for many people.
I would not recommend going out of the way for it.
I take dried squid for lunch on trips lately.
Chris Townsend
2003-10-30 22:01:58 UTC
Permalink
In message <3fa17be5$***@darkstar>, Eugene Miya <***@cse.ucsc.edu>
writes
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
the Aurora Watcher's Handbook.
Post by Chris Townsend
Or Svalbard. There's a Northern Lights research station not far outside
Longyearben on Spitsbergen.
It's a fascinating place. 78 North. The farthest north I've been.
Many places to visit and for vastly different purposes.
Chile is also interesting at work for the moment.
For my work any wild country is interesting but for current project it's
Scotland.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
I must get back to Alaska again. Sometime.
I am learning about Alaska cancer treatment centers......
Long distances to travel I assume. It's bad enough in the Highlands.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
I've not seen super great ones, but a couple of nice impressive ones.
The Yukon one was amazing. I lay on my back for an hour staring at the
sky, completely oblivious of the cold.
Well coming back from Kuenzli's town near Fairbanks, I saw an short
lived impressive one.
I've seen good ones in Norway but nothing quite as mesmerising as the
Yukon one.

There was a good display reported here last night in the Borders and
Central Belt. I went outside twice but it was cloudy. I could just see a
faint pale glow behind the clouds. Tonight was meant to be good to but
it's pouring with rain.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Norway, too. Lute fisk. If Pete mentions haggis.
I haven't tried lute fisk.
Oh, it's okay. It's more challenge food for many people.
I would not recommend going out of the way for it.
I take dried squid for lunch on trips lately.
The worst thing I've eaten recently was a certain energy bar. Not all
challenging food comes from the past.
Gary S.
2003-10-30 23:04:25 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 22:01:58 +0000, Chris Townsend
Post by Chris Townsend
The worst thing I've eaten recently was a certain energy bar. Not all
challenging food comes from the past.
Some of the energy bars are worth saving only for a very serious
emergency. Their performance-oriented target market must have few
taste buds.

Happy trails,
Gary (net.yogi.bear)
------------------------------------------------
at the 51st percentile of ursine intelligence

Gary D. Schwartz, Needham, MA, USA
Please reply to: garyDOTschwartzATpoboxDOTcom
Robertwgross
2003-10-30 23:18:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary S.
Some of the energy bars are worth saving only for a very serious
emergency. Their performance-oriented target market must have few
taste buds.
Ah-ha. The infamous Kendal Mint Cake.

---Bob Gross---
Chris Townsend
2003-10-31 00:00:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robertwgross
Post by Gary S.
Some of the energy bars are worth saving only for a very serious
emergency. Their performance-oriented target market must have few
taste buds.
Ah-ha. The infamous Kendal Mint Cake.
Is that an energy bar now? I guess so. I was practically brought up on
it back in the sixties when I started hiking on school trips. It was an
essential for the UK hillwalker and came in wrappers showing Everest
with a quote from Hillary about how he ate it on the summit.

I haven't eaten any for years. I must admit I did quite like it.

I only ever see it in the English Lake District, where it's made, now.
In outdoor shops it's been replaced by more modern energy bars that
contain a little more than sugar and flavourings.
Peter Clinch
2003-10-31 09:11:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
I haven't eaten any for years. I must admit I did quite like it.
It's one of those things I loved as a kid but now I look back on it I
wonder what on earth my taste buds were doing... (c.f. bubble gum, cola,
etc.)
Post by Chris Townsend
I only ever see it in the English Lake District, where it's made, now.
In outdoor shops it's been replaced by more modern energy bars that
contain a little more than sugar and flavourings.
Available from your friendly (non-Lakes) neighbourhood Tiso's, amongst
others: it's still about if you look (in Tiso's they have a box on the
sales counters).

Odd how taking pure sugar and adding a lot of peppermint essence
conspires to make something sweeter than sugar and mintier than
peppermint essence. I now file it under "good in emergencies, because
it would take an emergency to mnke me want to eat it so I won't have
eaten it already" ;-/
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net ***@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
Chris Townsend
2003-10-31 12:50:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Clinch
Post by Chris Townsend
I haven't eaten any for years. I must admit I did quite like it.
It's one of those things I loved as a kid but now I look back on it I
wonder what on earth my taste buds were doing... (c.f. bubble gum,
cola, etc.)
I guess it's the same. Maybe I'll try a bar again and see what I think.
Post by Peter Clinch
Post by Chris Townsend
I only ever see it in the English Lake District, where it's made,
now. In outdoor shops it's been replaced by more modern energy bars
that contain a little more than sugar and flavourings.
Available from your friendly (non-Lakes) neighbourhood Tiso's, amongst
others: it's still about if you look (in Tiso's they have a box on the
sales counters).
I don't have a local Tiso's (there is one 40 miles away in Inverness,
I'll have a look next time I'm there). Ellis Brighams, Nevisport,
Mountain Supplies, Mountain Spirit and Black's don't stock it - or if
they do it's well hidden.
Post by Peter Clinch
Odd how taking pure sugar and adding a lot of peppermint essence
conspires to make something sweeter than sugar and mintier than
peppermint essence. I now file it under "good in emergencies, because
it would take an emergency to mnke me want to eat it so I won't have
eaten it already" ;-/
I file it under "I haven't bought that stuff in ages"! I tend to just
carry more food than I'll eat so I always have some left at the end of
the day. Flapjack/muesli bars and trail mix usually.
Peter Clinch
2003-10-31 13:09:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
I don't have a local Tiso's (there is one 40 miles away in Inverness,
I'll have a look next time I'm there). Ellis Brighams, Nevisport,
Mountain Supplies, Mountain Spirit and Black's don't stock it - or if
they do it's well hidden.
Whatever, it's basically inedible so I'd stick to the flapjacks!

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net ***@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
Eugene Miya
2003-11-05 00:20:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
Flapjack/muesli bars and trail mix usually.
Muesli bring up the topic which hasn't been here for quitre a while.
It's a sore point for one English climbing partner that the US
doesn't sell a decent muesli. For some reason ours tend to have lots of
corn flakes.
Chris Townsend
2003-11-05 01:29:50 UTC
Permalink
In message <3fa8504a$***@darkstar>, Eugene Miya <***@cse.ucsc.edu>
writes
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Flapjack/muesli bars and trail mix usually.
Muesli bring up the topic which hasn't been here for quitre a while.
It's a sore point for one English climbing partner that the US
doesn't sell a decent muesli. For some reason ours tend to have lots of
corn flakes.
I mostly eat granola in the US.

I did find some decent muesli in a natural food store in Seattle.

Most commercial UK muesli isn't very good.
Eugene Miya
2003-11-12 23:58:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
I mostly eat granola in the US.
I did find some decent muesli in a natural food store in Seattle.
Most commercial UK muesli isn't very good.
It is and mostly has been left overs.

I can understand why other cultures look at English speakers strange
for even considering eating Muesli. That is the power of marketing.
Chris Townsend
2003-11-13 00:33:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
I mostly eat granola in the US.
I did find some decent muesli in a natural food store in Seattle.
Most commercial UK muesli isn't very good.
It is and mostly has been left overs.
I can understand why other cultures look at English speakers strange
for even considering eating Muesli. That is the power of marketing.
Though muesli began in Switzerland, I believe.

Most cultures eat something other cultures think strange.
Eugene Miya
2003-11-13 22:43:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Eugene Miya
decent muesli
It is and mostly has been left overs.
I can understand why other cultures look at English speakers strange
for even considering eating Muesli. That is the power of marketing.
Though muesli began in Switzerland, I believe.
Yes.
Best with hot chocolate and yogurt.
Post by Chris Townsend
Most cultures eat something other cultures think strange.
It's a hungry world.

Slurp.
Gary S.
2003-11-14 00:04:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Most cultures eat something other cultures think strange.
It's a hungry world.
Slurp.
No need to go outside one culture. Within the US, there are so many
sub-cultures with dramatically different food choices.

Just to start, think that some people eat barbecue, and some eat vegan
food.

This doesn't even touch on religious food restrictions.

Some slurp, some not.

Happy trails,
Gary (net.yogi.bear)
------------------------------------------------
at the 51st percentile of ursine intelligence

Gary D. Schwartz, Needham, MA, USA
Please reply to: garyDOTschwartzATpoboxDOTcom
Eugene Miya
2003-11-13 23:57:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary S.
Post by Eugene Miya
It's a hungry world.
No need to go outside one culture.
This is only somewhat true as a generalization.
It's like going to Florida (Galen's state) and visiting EPCOT's country
pavilions. This is why travel is important, to get the context,
the USA has diversity, but lacks context. This is why we are still fighting
in the Dark Ages.
Post by Gary S.
Within the US, there are so many
sub-cultures with dramatically different food choices.
I would be careful making generalizations about these cultures in the US
restaurant context. A good example would be Mexico which has Napoleanic
justice like France. Are you picking up the cultural benefits of the
environment where you are eating food. To quote a friend about Pelton
you want to drink milk tea with the guy who was holding an AK at you a
moment ago.

Go to EPCOT but remember why it's there.
Post by Gary S.
Just to start, think that some people eat barbecue, and some eat vegan
food.
BBQ wood is a luxury that many cultures can't afford.
Post by Gary S.
This doesn't even touch on religious food restrictions.
Some slurp, some not.
You can starve.
Or you can eat grubs or blubber/muktuk.
Chris Townsend
2003-11-14 00:05:24 UTC
Permalink
In message <3fb41711$***@darkstar>, Eugene Miya <***@cse.ucsc.edu>
writes
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Eugene Miya
decent muesli
It is and mostly has been left overs.
I can understand why other cultures look at English speakers strange
for even considering eating Muesli. That is the power of marketing.
Though muesli began in Switzerland, I believe.
Yes.
Best with hot chocolate and yogurt.
Yoghurt definitely. Not sure about the chocolate. Sliced banana is good.

I think the original had apple.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Most cultures eat something other cultures think strange.
It's a hungry world.
You eat what you can get.
Post by Eugene Miya
Slurp.
Eugene Miya
2003-11-14 00:02:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Eugene Miya
decent muesli
It is and mostly has been left overs.
Though muesli began in Switzerland, I believe.
Best with hot chocolate and yogurt.
Yoghurt definitely. Not sure about the chocolate. Sliced banana is good.
As a drink.
Post by Chris Townsend
I think the original had apple.
Fruits: sure. Remember Chris
left overs.
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Most cultures eat something other cultures think strange.
It's a hungry world.
You eat what you can get.
Hopefully.
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Slurp.
Babies.
Chris Townsend
2003-11-14 11:51:42 UTC
Permalink
In message <3fb4298b$***@darkstar>, Eugene Miya <***@cse.ucsc.edu>
writes
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Eugene Miya
decent muesli
It is and mostly has been left overs.
Though muesli began in Switzerland, I believe.
Best with hot chocolate and yogurt.
Yoghurt definitely. Not sure about the chocolate. Sliced banana is good.
As a drink.
Ah. I've seen people pour orange juice on muesli.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
I think the original had apple.
Fruits: sure. Remember Chris
left overs.
Haggis.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Most cultures eat something other cultures think strange.
It's a hungry world.
You eat what you can get.
Hopefully.
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Slurp.
Babies.
It's in the Bible.
Pat OConnell
2003-11-14 15:19:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
writes
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Eugene Miya
decent muesli
It is and mostly has been left overs.
Though muesli began in Switzerland, I believe.
Best with hot chocolate and yogurt.
Yoghurt definitely. Not sure about the chocolate. Sliced banana is good.
As a drink.
Ah. I've seen people pour orange juice on muesli.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
I think the original had apple.
Fruits: sure. Remember Chris
left overs.
Haggis.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Most cultures eat something other cultures think strange.
It's a hungry world.
You eat what you can get.
Hopefully.
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Slurp.
Babies.
It's in the Bible.
Sounds like you guys have been on diets. Museli, babies, sushi, reindeer,
manatee. Next thing will be cheeseburgers, "Freedom Fries" and other
inedibles...
--
Pat O'Connell
[note munged EMail address]
Take nothing but pictures, Leave nothing but footprints,
Kill nothing but vandals...
Eugene Miya
2003-11-15 22:15:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat OConnell
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
decent muesli
Most cultures eat something other cultures think strange.
You eat what you can get.
Post by Eugene Miya
Slurp.
Babies.
It's in the Bible.
Sounds like you guys have been on diets.
Bait for literacy trolling.

Fewer literates here.
Post by Pat OConnell
Museli, babies, sushi, reindeer,
manatee. Next thing will be cheeseburgers, "Freedom Fries" and other
inedibles...
Maybe with soy sauce.
Pat OConnell
2003-11-16 07:49:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Pat OConnell
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
decent muesli
Most cultures eat something other cultures think strange.
You eat what you can get.
Post by Eugene Miya
Slurp.
Babies.
It's in the Bible.
Sounds like you guys have been on diets.
Bait for literacy trolling.
Fewer literates here.
Post by Pat OConnell
Museli, babies, sushi, reindeer, manatee. Next thing will be
cheeseburgers, "Freedom Fries" and other inedibles...
Maybe with soy sauce.
Makes the "freedom fries" soggy, but good with everything else. Pass me an
unagi and a bit of wasabi, please. Slurp indeed.
--
Pat O'Connell
[note munged EMail address]
Take nothing but pictures, Leave nothing but footprints,
Kill nothing but vandals...
Eugene Miya
2003-11-19 06:41:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat OConnell
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Pat OConnell
Museli, babies, sushi, reindeer, manatee. Next thing will be
cheeseburgers, "Freedom Fries" and other inedibles...
Maybe with soy sauce.
Makes the "freedom fries" soggy, but good with everything else. Pass me an
unagi and a bit of wasabi, please. Slurp indeed.
Naw, dip, eat quickly.

SE of you.
Eugene Miya
2003-11-22 05:18:00 UTC
Permalink
Pat OConnell <***@cox.net> wrote: ...

Was just an hour S of you.
Jim Roberts
2004-01-05 19:35:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eugene Miya
Was just an hour S of you.
Mornings on the mountain... I put water and powd milk on it. Yummm.

jimbatty
Eugene Miya
2004-01-09 16:07:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Roberts
Post by Eugene Miya
Was just an hour S of you.
Old post. I was just in LV speaking with Pat over the phone
(email bounced).
Post by Jim Roberts
Mornings on the mountain... I put water and powd milk on it. Yummm.
Just made Mexican hot chocolate.
Did have a Muesli like cereal.

Gary S.
2003-10-31 18:00:46 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 31 Oct 2003 09:11:30 +0000, Peter Clinch
Post by Peter Clinch
peppermint essence. I now file it under "good in emergencies, because
it would take an emergency to mnke me want to eat it so I won't have
eaten it already" ;-/
Yes, the idea is that it won't take much of an "emergency" to eat the
spare Snickers bar, but you will wait for a real emergency to go for
the fuel bar.

I have even heard recommeded to use dog biscuits for the emergency
rations, with the guarantee that they will only be eaten then.

Happy trails,
Gary (net.yogi.bear)
------------------------------------------------
at the 51st percentile of ursine intelligence

Gary D. Schwartz, Needham, MA, USA
Please reply to: garyDOTschwartzATpoboxDOTcom
Jim Curl
2003-10-31 18:37:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary S.
I have even heard recommeded to use dog biscuits for the emergency
rations, with the guarantee that they will only be eaten then.
Condensed mincemeat pie filling.

A number of years ago, after climbing Thunderbolt Peak, my partner
and I ran into this guy who had failed to hook up with his partner.
He really wanted to climb North Pal, but didn't want to do it alone.
Thinking that extending my trip might be fun, I told him I'd do it,
but that I would have no way to get home and I didn't have enough
food. He said that he'd detour to San Jose and take me home (he
lived in LA) and that he had *plenty* of food.

Well, after climbing North Pal it turned out that he had plenty of
food for two small sedentary people, but not enough for me. The
next morning we hiked out and I was hitting the wall. I'm the kind
of person who needs a steady stream of calories or else I bonk.
As we passed by Mt. Agassiz he tried to get me to climb it with him,
but there was just no way. Then he mentioned that he had some
"emergency food". Out it came. A 9 ounce bar of condensed
mincemeat pie filling. I looked dubiously at it, but the
ingredients were such that it had approximately the same
nutritional composition and calories as a couple of Power Bars.
So I ate half of it (he declined) and we climbed the peak.

And I could taste cloves for the next several days.
Gary S.
2003-10-31 18:41:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Curl
Post by Gary S.
I have even heard recommeded to use dog biscuits for the emergency
rations, with the guarantee that they will only be eaten then.
Condensed mincemeat pie filling.
A number of years ago, after climbing Thunderbolt Peak, my partner
That's an interesting idea. We have mincemeat (actually minced dried
fruits and spices) at the supermarket.

Lots of water would be wise.

Happy trails,
Gary (net.yogi.bear)
------------------------------------------------
at the 51st percentile of ursine intelligence

Gary D. Schwartz, Needham, MA, USA
Please reply to: garyDOTschwartzATpoboxDOTcom
Chris Townsend
2003-10-30 23:57:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary S.
On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 22:01:58 +0000, Chris Townsend
Post by Chris Townsend
The worst thing I've eaten recently was a certain energy bar. Not all
challenging food comes from the past.
Some of the energy bars are worth saving only for a very serious
emergency. Their performance-oriented target market must have few
taste buds.
Very few. And steel teeth! Some set like concrete in temperature below
40F and have to be warmed next to the body for quite a while before you
can eat them without breaking your teeth. This makes them rather useless
for emergencies.

There are some good bars though. I like Bear Valley MealPack ones.
Eugene Miya
2003-10-31 07:28:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Gary S.
Post by Chris Townsend
The worst thing I've eaten recently was a certain energy bar. Not all
challenging food comes from the past.
Some of the energy bars are worth saving only for a very serious
emergency. Their performance-oriented target market must have few
taste buds.
Very few. And steel teeth! Some set like concrete in temperature below
40F and have to be warmed next to the body for quite a while before you
can eat them without breaking your teeth. This makes them rather useless
for emergencies.
When cold, and brittle, whap against a hard object. Eat small pieces.
Warm and dissolve a bit before chewing.

Higher temps, pull and chew.

You have to have appropriate patience in emergencies.
Chris Townsend
2003-10-31 12:47:21 UTC
Permalink
In message <3fa21d4b$***@darkstar>, Eugene Miya <***@cse.ucsc.edu>
writes
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Gary S.
Post by Chris Townsend
The worst thing I've eaten recently was a certain energy bar. Not all
challenging food comes from the past.
Some of the energy bars are worth saving only for a very serious
emergency. Their performance-oriented target market must have few
taste buds.
Very few. And steel teeth! Some set like concrete in temperature below
40F and have to be warmed next to the body for quite a while before you
can eat them without breaking your teeth. This makes them rather useless
for emergencies.
When cold, and brittle, whap against a hard object. Eat small pieces.
Warm and dissolve a bit before chewing.
I do that with chocolate. And I've broken up a Mars Bar with an ice axe
in the past (another bar I don't eat any more).

They used to say that an essential skill for being an instructor at
Glenmore Lodge, Scotland's national mountaineering centre, was being
able to unwrap a Mars Bar while wearing Dachstein mitts.
Post by Eugene Miya
Higher temps, pull and chew.
You have to have appropriate patience in emergencies.
Easier to carry something you can just eat! I take soft bars and dried
fruit as backup/emergency foods.
Eugene Miya
2003-11-01 00:48:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Warm and dissolve a bit before chewing.
I do that with chocolate. And I've broken up a Mars Bar with an ice axe
in the past (another bar I don't eat any more).
Mars i no longer sold in the US.
It is now called Snickers with Almonds. Go figure.
Post by Chris Townsend
They used to say that an essential skill for being an instructor at
Glenmore Lodge, Scotland's national mountaineering centre, was being
able to unwrap a Mars Bar while wearing Dachstein mitts.
8^)
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
You have to have appropriate patience in emergencies.
Easier to carry something you can just eat! I take soft bars and dried
fruit as backup/emergency foods.
That's why I used the adjective appropriate.
Chris Townsend
2003-11-01 17:26:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Warm and dissolve a bit before chewing.
I do that with chocolate. And I've broken up a Mars Bar with an ice axe
in the past (another bar I don't eat any more).
Mars i no longer sold in the US.
It is now called Snickers with Almonds. Go figure.
Mars in the UK doesn't have almonds. We have Snickers here but they used
to be called something else here. Marathon I think.
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
They used to say that an essential skill for being an instructor at
Glenmore Lodge, Scotland's national mountaineering centre, was being
able to unwrap a Mars Bar while wearing Dachstein mitts.
8^)
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
You have to have appropriate patience in emergencies.
Easier to carry something you can just eat! I take soft bars and dried
fruit as backup/emergency foods.
That's why I used the adjective appropriate.
Of course what people are usually short of is something to drink not
something to eat.
Eugene Miya
2003-11-05 00:13:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
Post by Chris Townsend
Post by Eugene Miya
You have to have appropriate patience in emergencies.
Easier to carry something you can just eat! I take soft bars and dried
fruit as backup/emergency foods.
That's why I used the adjective appropriate.
Of course what people are usually short of is something to drink not
something to eat.
You can survive much longer without food.
There is a literature on expedition foods, but there is much less known
about thirst since people can't last as long.

The current reality show Survivor, as opposed to the UK/BBC series, has
to provide some degree of fresh drinking water (usually wells or springs),
but they have clearly had to contrive wells.
Mach Twain
2003-10-26 14:37:44 UTC
Permalink
auroral activity tonight. Peak expected about 10 pm ET in North Am.
Anyone else had unusual difficulty sleeping last night? Like a speed
or cocaine sensation. Nope, it wasn't anything I took.

Mach Twain
Warren Weisman
2003-10-27 09:32:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Bading
Coronal mass ejection, good chance for auroral activity tonight. Peak
expected about 10 pm ET in North Am.
Good Luck
Reporting live from Eagle River, Alaska, I can assure you that you're
not missing anything, yet. I'll keep my eyes pealed, I know there's
supposed to be alot of activity lately, but so far, nada.
Eugene Miya
2003-10-27 18:26:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Warren Weisman
Reporting live from Eagle River, Alaska, I can assure you that you're
not missing anything, yet.
Well the thing to do is check the www.uaf.edu web site.
T
2003-10-31 12:23:12 UTC
Permalink
http://www.rocketroberts.com/astro/northernlights30oct2003.htm
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